Propositioned on Prop 16 - Affirmative Action Is Back on the Ballot


The question of affirmative action has made its way back onto the ballot for voters to decide. In today's episode of Propositioned, Kris Ankarlo speaks to both sides about Prop 16, a ballot initiative that's reignited a 25-year-old debate over affirmative action in California.

Here is what your vote on Prop 16 means:

A "yes" vote supports this constitutional amendment to repeal Proposition 209 (1996), which stated that the government and public institutions cannot discriminate against or grant preferential treatment to persons on the basis of race, sex, color, ethnicity, or national origin in public employment, public education, and public contracting.
A "no" vote opposes this constitutional amendment, thereby keeping Proposition 209 (1996), which stated that the government and public institutions cannot discriminate against or grant preferential treatment to persons on the basis of race, sex, color, ethnicity, or national origin in public employment, public education, and public contracting.

In 1996, voters passed Proposition 209 which essentially ended affirmative action involving race-based or sex-based preferences in California. If Prop. 16 passes, the state constitution would be changed to once again allow state, local and other public departments to (within the bounds of federal law) use affirmative action programs for hiring that grant preferences based on race, sex, color, ethnicity and national origin in public employment, public education, and public contracting.

Kris Ankarlo spoke with both sides to help us get a better understanding what Prop 16 would mean if passed in November.

Guests:

Democratic Assemblywoman Dr. Shirley Weber (San Diego)

UCLA Law Professor Richard Sander

No on 16 Vice-Chair Manuel Klausner

Asian Americans Advancing Justice LA President Emeritus Stewart Kwoh

Photo: Getty Images